Florist Maurice Harris on his new Eau Rose Diptyque collection


Each perfume evokes an emotion. In Stories of perfumes, TZR asks taste makers, celebrities and industry insiders to share the stories behind the smells of their past and present.

To call Maurice Harris a florist is like calling Beyoncé’s singer – technically correct, but a huge understatement nonetheless. Since launching her Los Angeles-based floral design studio Bloom & Plume (which now doubles as a quaint cafe), Harris’ vibrant and opulent arrangements have built up a viral following, with fans of Beyoncé herself (who has presented his creations throughout his visual album, Black is king) to brands like Louis Vuitton and The Row. But unlike other artists, Harris is not a dark, mysterious figure behind his designs. All you have to do is browse her Instagram to get a feel for her vibrant personality (we especially love her in-depth personifications of her flower arrangements, from “Winter Wendy” to “Robust Rhonda”) – or, tune in to the floral. from HBO’s arrangement reality competition, Full bloom, or its Quibi program, Table’s center (note: both will encourage you to buy garden shears).

Harris’s larger-than-life personality made him the perfect artist to collaborate with Diptyque on the perfume house’s new Unleash the Rose collection, featuring an all-new Eau Rose eau de parfum, as well as three new scented candles to the rose infused with notes of chamomile, lychee and artichoke. “When I work on floral designs, I try to create something organic, intoxicating, and memorable,” says Harris. “The rose is one of the most iconic flowers of all time, but I knew I wanted to take this very traditional scent and extract something unexpected from it.”

Before, TZR asked Harris about the different scents in his life and the potency, creativity and comfort of his scent every day.

The scent of strength

“Rose reminds me of two powerful women in my life. [First,] my grandmother, who often mixed her rose with notes of gardenia and lily of the valley – there was something so memorable about her scent. And then I had a former boss who wore the most intoxicating rose scent I have ever smelled. You could feel her coming before she walked into a room and it lingered when she left. There was something so powerful about it. It was never overwhelming. I think of power and beauty and grace when I think of the rose and these two women.

The scent of duality

“Chamomile and lychee are unexpected notes for me – they evoke very distinct emotions in me. Chamomile tea always makes me feel warm and hazy and is calming and relaxing. On the other hand, I find the lychee very invigorating. I was there to try to blend these two scents and I think they ultimately complement each other beautifully.

The scent of creativity

“Creativity smells earthy and musky because most of the time, creativity is a hard day’s work. ”

The smell of his house

“Every room in my house has a special scent because I feel like the scent helps cement memories. When you smell the rose with it [pine], I want you to think, ‘Oh, it smells like Maurice’s house and I always feel welcome and warm there.’ Or if you walk into my room, Diptyque’s Bois Feu de Bois usually burns, which in my opinion smells like a library of sensuality.

The scent of comfort

“For me, comfort is sitting in my wing chair upholstered in Kente fabric wrapped in cedar planks while sipping a cup of fresh mint tea. So it’s fabric and cedar and mint with just a hint of canine because Leroy, my standard poodle, always has to be nearby.

The scent of joy

“Herbs! Herbs all day long. I grow a lot of them in my garden – all different geraniums, pineapples, mint, sage. One of my favorite things to do is run my fingers through the lemon verbena and smell my hands after – it’s so incredibly fragrant and puts me in the best mood.

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